Fixing 3 Kings Court

In 2018, Trident’s Bristol team began working at 3 Kings Court to repair the original clay tiled roof that is almost 150 years old. In any other instance, isolating the problem areas and fixing them quickly would have been enough. However, Alex Wallis, Principal Surveyor at our Bristol office, noticed that the lime torching was debonding as the tiles became porous and loose. This meant that the job was much bigger than fixing a few problem areas.

Alex himself has a personal link to the building, having owned two of the properties within the building in the past. His long-standing attachment to 3 Kings Court combined with his technical knowledge surmised that the building would need considerable work to ensure its long term survival.

After enlisting Melissa Osborne, Birmingham’s Principal Surveyor and conservation specialist, it was decided that the best way forward was to replace the whole roof. However, there is a significant risk of the structure not holding out under the weight of a newly installed lime torching. At the risk of damaging the building further, Trident advised the installation of a modern felt roofing applied to the whole structure.

In addition, the lead decorative finals require widespread remedial works, the windows and gutters need to be repaired and decorated, the decorative stone work and pointing requires refurbishment and the timber spiral stairs and balusters need to be renovated and made safe.

The leaseholders at 3 Kings Court have approved a first phase of isolated patch repairs. Following a successful Listed Building Consent application, Alex is now compiling a Planned Preventative Maintenance Schedule to enable the budgeting and phasing of the works over the next 5-7 years. Without significant investment this beautiful and iconic building will fall into disrepair. With only 18 lease holders to draw funds from the phasing of the works will require careful planning to ensure it is financially viable for the lease holders.

They have set up a JustGiving page here, and are hoping to keep this piece of Bristol history alive. We’ll update on our support with this project as it happens…

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